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Indeed, 85% of teen daters expect to hear from their significant other at least once a day, and 11% expect to hear from them hourly. ’ On witnessing someone argue with a romantic partner on social media: See, the thing that they did wrong is they didn’t put it in messages. When somebody’s willing to fight, they bring out their problems and comments and let the whole world see and not just keep it between them. Teens take a number of steps to show that they are in a romantic relationship with someone, and many of these rituals take place on social media.This issue came up frequently in our focus groups, as many teens expressed a desire (and in many cases, an expectation) that they hear from their significant other on a regular basis. In our focus groups, teens spoke about the reasons why couples might showcase their relationship on social media, from seeking attention to letting others know that they are now “off the market.” I mean, 'cause like if you and then person are, like, super open and you both use Facebook a lot, then you’re going to like post pictures of yourself on Facebook.

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But even as text messaging and social media play a pronounced role in all other aspects of teen life, teens feel strongly that an in-person conversation -- or at worst, a phone call -- is the most socially acceptable way to break up with someone.

Teens in our focus groups generally agreed that breaking up with a partner over text messaging or social media illustrates a lack of maturity on the part of the person who is ending the relationship.

Because like more people ask questions and stuff like that.

Digital communication plays a role in all aspects of teen romantic relationships, including when those relationships end.

But even though breaking up via text message is largely frowned upon, 27% of teens with dating experience admit to breaking up with someone by text.

In our focus groups, we heard from teens who have broken up with someone via text.

It was relatively rare for teens in our focus groups to talk about meeting romantic partners online. These interactions have their own unwritten – but widely understood – rules.

Some teens explained that they would not trust someone they met online because of the likelihood of misrepresentation, while others were generally distrustful of all strangers online. I was dating this girl that I met through a social website that probably hardly anybody knows about. Everything from one’s choice of emoji to the spelling of the word “hey” can carry a deeper meaning.

So I think he says more stuff, like how he feels through text. If I’m in a relationship or something, my girl, she won’t check my Instagram. She sees, like someone commented on it two hours ago...

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